If the sellers feel as if they are doing all the work, they might also be able to modify the existing agreement and add a termination if the broker doesn't meet certain obligations, like selling the home within a certain time frame, says Sandy Straley, a real estate agent in Layton, UT. Other obligations for the listing could include organizing open houses, creating and distributing printed materials, and even the posting of videos shot by drones, says Markel.
If you have chosen to sell your land privately, then you need to know that there are several ways that you can advertise your property. The absolute easiest way is to put out a ‘For Sale By Owner’ sign. This might give you better results than you expect. Many people searching for land simply get in their cars and drive around looking for a for sale sign. Make sure that you have some contact information on your sign.
You may also want a lawyer to produce and review contract documents; some states actually require you to hire one. Although you can find much of the paperwork online, Schorr says, “you need to tailor it to your deal — and the way you fill it out is just as important as what the boilerplate language says.” You’ll probably pay $1,000 to $3,000, depending on the cost of living in your area, but you’ll get an experienced pro who’s in your corner and can make sure the deal gets done right.
Land contracts are security agreements between a seller, known as a Vendor, and a buyer, known as a Vendee. The Vendor carries the financing for the Vendee, which may or may not contain an underlying loan. A main difference between a land contract and a mortgage is the buyer does not receive a deed or clear title to the property until the land contract is paid off.
Left unattended, vacant land quickly becomes overgrown with weeds, sprouts, saplings and other vegetation that can make it difficult for interested parties to view the property or imagine its suitability for a specific purpose. Even worse, prospective buyers may discount any offer they do make on land that is very overgrown or filled with garbage or other waste.

Equally, if you are thinking of buying a particular property, you don’t have to wait for a property to go on the market or appear in the real estate section of the newspaper in order to make an offer to purchase it.  There is nothing stopping you from approaching the owner directly and asking if they are prepared to sell their property if the price is right.
Mark has never been stuck with a piece of raw land because he always makes the deal irresistible. When selling the land, the typical deal structure is seller financing. Mark gets an initial down payment, which will usually cover his current out-of-pocket costs. Then, he gets monthly passive income in the form of a payment based on the seller financing terms.
To help avoid these issues, land owners in Brentwood or elsewhere should consider having overgrown properties mowed and any existing garbage or junk removed before showing. If the property is too large to mow the entire piece, sellers should consider at least creating a convenient mowed area for parking near the entrance. In addition, establishing a few mowed walking or driving trails throughout the land can help to encourage prospective buyers to explore and view the entire parcel.
Closing a real estate deal involves a fair amount of work and attention to detail (and of course, there’s always the chance that you could do something wrong). With a property like what you’re describing, the value that a professional closing agent brings to the table is a pretty easy thing to justify spending money on. In Virginia, I believe either an attorney or a title agency could do the job (but this kind of thing varies from state to state, so you may want to ask a local real state agent what they recommend).
As with other real estate transactions, land contracts require a “closing” to prepare, sign, and file all necessary legal documents. This article discusses the common steps a buyer and seller should take to close on a land contract purchase. For information on land contracts in general, see the Nolo article, The Basics of Land Contracts. And for a variety of useful articles on real estate closings, see Escrow and Closing in Nolo’s Real Estate section.
Once you’ve got the mechanics taken care of, all you need to do is collect absolutely everything you can think of that will describe your property, which may include, but will not be limited to, a written description, lots and lots of photographs, perhaps taken in different seasons, information about the local area, last year’s real estate taxes, aerial photos, road maps and perhaps a .pdf or .jpg copy of the survey, if available.
Hi Laura – in pretty much every case, you’ll have to at least sign the deed in front of a notary, so it’s a little strange they didn’t mention that. If they aren’t going to use a title company, that’s not necessarily a deal-killer thing, but it means they really need to understand what they’re doing, and how to get everything properly documented and closed (and if they didn’t mention the deed/notary thing, that makes me wonder).

chattels: items that are not fixed to the land or building structure e.g. fridges and are only included if specifically mentioned in the sale and purchase agreement. If chattels are included in the sale, they should be listed in detail in the sale contract. Some standard sales and purchase agreements included common chattels such as stove, fixed floor coverings, blinds and curtains.
I've seen a lot of different situations and dealt virtually every type of buyer, seller, lender and property type imaginable. After working through many of the different scenarios that can materialize in the real estate closing process, I have to admit – I understand why most people are intimidated by the idea of closing a real estate transaction themselves. For understandable reasons – there can be a lot of confusion and fear about how to close a real estate deal without the assistance of a professional.
Thanks for the quick response. When I took the documents, generated by the attorney, to the county recorder, they did not look at them. The attorney had explained to the buyer at the closing the significance of recording the deed, joking it would prevent me from reselling the property. In hindsight, the attorney was about to leave on a cruise, so he may have rushed through this transaction. I will contact the attorney for his assistance. Thank you again.
Writing a legally enforceable contract for sale with your buyer means spelling out any contingencies like the buyer obtaining financing if needed and doing due diligence to ensure the property suits intended needs. Look online to review real estate land contracts for your state to ensure that you don't overlook crucial factors. Processing the sale through an escrow at a title company will ensure that there are no liens or other claims to the deed that could cause problems down the road. Title companies also make sure that all legal details are in order, all documents are properly prepared and signed and the deed is officially recorded.
I suggest you go to your local real estate clubs and get more buyers there! You know, its like if you wanted to find a job really quick. You can go to several head hunters, several temp to hire agency, and you can put all these people to work for you - for not a dime of your money. Thats what I call people leveraging. When your at home, you are going to have several people calling you back to tell you about offers they have for you and you can then cherry pick the offers and take the one that best fits you. Real estate clubs are full of people who want to find you buyers - these people are called wholesalers. And guess what, you can have as many as you need. I say, work smart not hard!
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