If you feel that your agent isn't performing to your expectations, engage in an open conversation with them explaining what you feel isn't being done. Refer to the services spelled out in the contract. It's possible that miscommunication is the problem, and tour listing agent should get the opportunity to make it right. If you still don't see results, talk to other brokers at the firm carrying your listing and see if they can meet your needs.
If the buyer has secured financing or is planning on paying with cash, a contract for sale will be necessary. This contract will specify the terms of the sale and may also specify other documents required before transferring the deed. This may include the financial documents that are necessary to secure financing. The contract may also indicate that title insurance will be provided. In this case, the title company may be involved in the transaction.
Buildings: This chapter is intended to address land-only sales.  Obviously, if your land has buildings on it, those can add significantly to the value.  If the buildings are of any value, that is, a livable house or a barn or shed in good repair, this may be harder for you to estimate or to compare with others.  About the best you can hope to do is to compare the number of rooms/bedrooms, the square footage, the general condition, and overall appearance.  If the buildings are of marginal value, give them appropriate ranking, however as advice to a potential seller of real estate (I’d tell a potential buyer something else) don’t discount that shack or hovel too severely.  A lot of buyers seem to feel somehow assured if there’s a structure of any kind on a property.   Maybe it seems less intimidating than starting with empty woods.  So if it doesn’t leak too badly, and isn’t going to fall down in the next few years, you may consider bumping the price up a few thousand dollars, or leaving it where it is so that the building provides another inducement to buy.

Hmm, I would think that most attorneys would want to control the recording process themselves rather than leaving it up to the buyer (because most buyers have no idea how to do this). Does the deed say that it was drafted by the buyer, or by the attorney? I’ve never heard of a rule where ONLY the buyer could record these things (maybe it works differently in Illinois, I’m not sure), but I know most recorders will only accept the original copies… so if you didn’t have the original copies (with “wet ink”), that could’ve been the issue too.
A seller who accepts the terms of the buyer’s purchase offer should sign the offer making it an official purchase agreement. The seller may be required by law to provide certain disclosures such as of any known defects of the property, including the existence of any lead-based paint. Required real estate disclosures vary by state, and a real estate professional or attorney may be able to assist sellers with these forms. For details, see the Nolo articles under What Sellers Must Disclose About a House’s Condition in the Selling a House section of this site.

I have this document available for members of the REtipster Club to download for free, but it’s not something you can get here on the blog (because it’s pretty specific to land transactions, and I wouldn’t want people trying to use it for selling houses or other types of real estate, because it’s not really intended for that). Does that make sense?
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Agents are generally pretty good at protecting their clients’ position.  They also have a vested interest in ensuring that settlement proceeds without delay so that they can get paid their commission.  Without an agent, and in particular without a lawyer or conveyancer involved in the negotiation process, vendors and purchasers can sometimes commit to terms and conditions that are unworkable, ill-advised and even unlawful.   For example, vendor finance clauses, rent-to-buy conditions, options and the like are very complicated even for seasoned investors.  Getting conveyancing and in particular legal advice and assistance is the key.
Perhaps you’ve inherited some land, decided to sell some investment property or are just in need of some extra cash. Either way, selling land by owner can require some extra work but in the long run will ultimately be more profitable than selling with a real estate agent. There are a few things you must keep in mind before deciding to sell land by owner.
The first thing you must do when you have signed a contract to buy a property, especially where there are professionals involved in representing the interests of either party, is to lodge a caveat to protect your interest in the property until settlement.  A caveat will stop the vendor from selling to someone else or encumbering the property without notice to you.
I found the affidavit that you linked to and I get how to fill it out but the thing I’m stuck on is the notarizing. It has to be signed by both the seller/buyer and notarized. Obviously we aren’t near one another; can this document be notarized separately? Should I sign/notarize and then send it to the buyer for them to do the same? Have a mobile notary go to them? Any best practices?

When deeds are drafted as a part of a land sale, they have to be recorded to become a matter of the public record and protect the buyer's ownership rights. It is customary for buyers to pay for the cost of recording -- after all, it's the buyer that benefits from having his interest in the property entered in the public record. However, this custom isn't always the case, and some areas assign the fee to the seller, or to both parties equally.


With this in mind, I spent several months putting together a full-blown course that explains how this process works from start-to-finish. The course is designed specifically for people working in the land investing business, and it comes with dozens of video tutorials and document templates that give an in-depth explanation of each step along the way.
If you’re providing seller financing, you’ll still need to draft a deed, but this deed will be held in escrow until the final payment is made. Once that payment is made, the deed will be filed with its respective government agency, typically the county clerk. You can have an attorney, title agency, or a financial institution hold the median in escrow for you until the buyer makes the final payment.
The first thing you must do when you have signed a contract to buy a property, especially where there are professionals involved in representing the interests of either party, is to lodge a caveat to protect your interest in the property until settlement.  A caveat will stop the vendor from selling to someone else or encumbering the property without notice to you.
The steps above are fairly similar to transactions that involve owner financing. The primary exception is that a deal that involves owner financing requires a few additional documents. Depending on the state and the specifics of the transaction, some seller financed deals will make the most sense to use in conjunction with a land contract (aka – contract for deed), which I explain in this blog post). Likewise, other seller financed deals will make more sense to use in conjunction with a Promissory Note and Deed of Trust, which I explain in this blog post.
While it can take some work to find out what some people want, that’s just not the case with homebuyers. They aren’t going to play their cards close to the chest or make you guess about what they’re looking for. No, homebuyers are an upfront bunch. They know what they want, and if a house doesn’t deliver, they’ll let someone know — just watch an episode of House Hunters if you don’t believe us.
I agree with Ellen Chung, finding the right type of buyer to target is very important. Also, you should consider the amount of time you have to sell the land. If you are short on time due to back taxes owed or other financial obligations, your best bet may be to talk to a vacant land investor. You will not get the full market price for your property, but the typically can pay cash and close quickly.
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